Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

Health Blog

Blog

view:  full / summary

test from vistaprint

Posted on August 9, 2019 at 2:51 PM Comments comments (301)
test from vistaprint

New Super Green Smoothie

Posted on May 15, 2016 at 7:06 PM Comments comments (0)
     We recently started growing wheat grass to juice for all of the numerous health benefits. I am also a huge fan of smoothies because they help me to consume larger quantities of fruits and veggies then I would normally consume.   We decided to combine the wheat grass juice into the smoothie and deliciousness occurred! 

Here is what was in my super green smoothie:

  1 handful of organic cilantro ( this is my preferred system of measurement  and when I say approximately its because I basically just eyeball it and dump it in.The only exact measurement is the wheat grass :)

  1 handful of  organic mixed salad greens

  1 handful of organic kale

   2 tablespoons of  organic hulled hemp seeds

  2 tablespoons  of organic black chia seeds

  1 handful of organic dark sweet cherries frozen

  1 handful organic mango chunks frozen

  approximately 3 oz of organic beet juice

  approximately 3 oz of  organic goats milk blueberry kefir

  approximately 5 oz non sweetened organic almond milk

  3 oz of freshly juiced wheat grass

  approximately 1 oz organic pomegranate juice

  3 slices of fresh organic ginger

  4 slices of fresh organic lemon and peel

Blend it all together and drink! This made  three 16 oz glasses.

All of these ingredients are so good for you! I could list them all or I could just be lazy ( or as I like to call it efficient ) and post these lovely well written links to the numerous health benefits of these ingredients.


  • cilantro helps to remove heavy metals from your body, is an antioxidant and more 






















  • dark sweet cherries 


















      Hope any of this information was of use and helps to motivate you to create some delicious super green smoothies of your own!


Beets, Berries, Burdock.

Posted on March 9, 2016 at 12:54 AM Comments comments (0)

     In my effort to eat healthy and still not have to cook too many meals I have turned to smoothies. I can grab a bunch of powders, fruits and vegetables, throw in some cashew milk, hit blend and breakfast is served.
 
     My latest creation is to help detoxify the body while getting some of my daily dose of fruits and veggies. I begin with organic beet root powder because it is easier than cooking the beets and then blending them. I add 1 tablespoon of that, 1 tablespoon of organic burdock root powder, a piece of organic raw ginger, a handful of organic parsley, a handful of  organic kale, a handful of a mixed organic spring mix, 1 cup of mixed organic frozen berries (cherries, blueberries, and raspberries) and vanilla cashew milk. This sounds like it might taste bad but honestly berries seem to overtake the other tastes.
 
     The combination above seems odd but every ingredient has a medicinal reason for being there. Let’s begin with the beets. Beets are naturally rich in nitrates which helps to improve blood flow and lower blood pressure. Beets are also rich in iron, magnesium, A, C, B1, B3, and B6, calcium, copper, phosphorus, sodium, iodine, carbohydrates, protein and fiber. The next ingredient is the burdock root powder. Burdock roots help to support detoxification of the organs and elimination systems like the liver, kidneys, and skin. This root is also high in inulin which is a starchy carbohydrate that is a prebiotic and prebiotics are good for gut health. This root has been known to be effective for all sorts of skin disorders (acne, eczema, psoriasis) and because of its cleansing effect on the kidneys it is good for gout as well. Now for a quick disclaimer on these herbs:
 
Burdock root is a common vegetable and is considered to be safe for most people.
 People with skin conditions may see an increase in symptoms when they first start to take burdock. To decrease this effect, try combining it with more eliminating herbs as well as starting with a lower dose and slowly increasing the dosage.
There have been a few reports of adverse effects of burdock in people allergic to Asteraceae family plants.
Personal note on this- I have psoriasis and have seen a great improvement in just 3 days of drinking this smoothie. Hopefully this will only improve.
 
     Next up is ginger root. Ginger has great anti-inflammatory benefits from exercise soreness to rheumatism. This root can lower cholesterol and help prevent blood clots, and is good for upset stomach, cramps, coughs, and colds. Some studies now suggest it helps in the fight against skin, ovarian, colon, and breast cancers.
 
 The next ingredient is the handful of tasty berries. Blueberries and raspberries have vitamin K, manganese, vitamin C, and fiber. Cherries have powerful antioxidants, reduce inflammation, are a natural source of melatonin, and help reduce belly fat.
 
     Next up are the vegetables, kale and parsley. I have to add that technically parsley is an herb but my brain identifies it as a vegetable so I have to hide it in my food well blended up so I will eat it.  Kale has vitamin A, K, C, B6, B1, B2, B3, magnesium, copper, calcium, and manganese. Parsley has folates, vitamin C, A, K, calcium, iron, and beta-carotene.

     The final ingredient, cashew milk, is probably the least healthy. Normally cashew milk is very healthy but as already mentioned, I avoid domestic manual labor whenever possible so I don’t make my own. I buy my cashew milk flavored with vanilla. It is unsweetened which is a little better but not as healthy as it could be. I am going to go ahead and rationalize (with myself of course) that the wonderfully healthy ingredients in this smoothie outweigh this one not 100% healthy ingredient. If you really want to go for it you can make your own cashew milk with soaked cashews and organic vanilla and this will be the breakfast of champions!

Helpful Herbs from A to Z- The letter P.

Posted on January 31, 2016 at 10:57 PM Comments comments (0)
      Today’s blog is on helpful herbs that start with the letter P. These are for educational purposes only. The information is not intended to treat or diagnosis anything. Please check with your physician before taking any herbs or herbal formulas and use extreme caution if you are pregnant, nursing, or have any serious health conditions.

     In the last blog we talked a little bit about the energy of an herb-whether it was a warming or cooling herb. Another factor to consider in choosing an herb goes back to taste. If the herb is sour or pungent it can be astringent in nature. An astringent is something that contracts and dries tissues. This is great if you have a need for that in things like running noses or open wounds. If you are already experiencing tissues that are dry and in need of moisture this will only aggravate the problem. You could add a moisturizing herb (usually these are warm and sweet in nature) to the first herb, because you want the other properties that first herb has to offer minus the astringent nature. Or you could choose another herb all together that helped addressed the issue and wasn’t astringent. This is why a one size fits all approach to herbalism isn’t recommended. 

     There are many beneficial herbs in the world and they can help to aid in your overall health and wellness when all factors are considered. Hope this helps explain a little more about the wonderful world of herbs. Now on to some herbs that begin with the letter P.
 
Western Herb

Prickly Ash ( Zanthoxylum Americanum)
 
Parts Used:  Bark and berries
 
Energy and Taste:  Spicy, warm and diffusing
 
Constituents: Alkaloids, fagarine, coumarins, resin, tannins, volatile oils
 
Internal Uses: Sluggish circulation, arthritis and rheumatic conditions, stimulates blood and lymphatic circulation so good for skin issues as well. Can create a sense of heat in the stomach due to its warming nature. Take ½ oz. of powder in pills or tea 3 x a day.
 
Topical Uses: Helps to heal wounds and relieve toothaches when applied topically. Can apply as a poultice or powder.
 
 
Chinese Herb

Peony(Shao Yao)
 
Paeonia Lactiflora
 
Parts Used: Root

Energy and Taste: Slightly cold, bitter and acrid
 
Constituents: Astragalin, benzoic acid, calcium, copper, galic acid, glucose, linoleic acid, magnesium, poeoniflorin, paeonol, potassium, tannins, zinc.
 
Internal Uses: Fevers, colds, nervous disorders, blood purifier, good for skin issues, menstrual syndromes. Take 5-10 grams as a tea or capsule.
 
 
Ayurveda Herb

Poppy (Papaver somniferum)
 
Ayurveda Name: Ahiphena
 
Parts Used: Seeds
 
Energy and Taste: Pungent, astringent, sweet and heating

Constituents:   Oleic and linoleic acids, thiamin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid, iron, copper, calcium, potassium, manganese, zinc, magnesium, opium alkaloids, papaverine.
 
Internal Uses: Poppy seed is a warming sleep aid taken a half hour before bed as a tea (4 TBS of seeds brewed) Can also be helpful for diarrhea, nerve pain, and coughs. 250 mg to 1 gram daily as powder or in food.
 
 
Hope any of this information was helpful. Check back for the next blog on helpful herbs that begin with the letter R.
 
 
Resources
The Way of Ayurvedic Herbs: A Contemporary Introduction and Useful Manual for the World's Oldest Healing System, Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa and Michael Tierra
 
The Way of Chinese Herbs, Michael Tierra
 

The Way of Herbs: Fully Updated with the Latest Developments in Herbal Science, Michael Tierra

Helpful herbs from A to Z-The letter O.

Posted on January 31, 2016 at 10:44 PM Comments comments (0)
 Today’s blog is on helpful herbs that begin with the letter O. This information is to inform only. This information is never meant to treat, diagnose, or cure anything. Always use caution and common sense when taking vitamins or herbs and check with your physician for any contraindications.
 
    In the last blog we talked about the taste of herbs and why they are important. In this blog I want to briefly discuss the energy of herbs and why that matters when considering which herb to take. Some herbs are cooling in nature (think of a cucumber) and others are warming in nature (think of ginger). This is important to consider when you are trying to find the right herbal treatment for what you are trying to address. Warming herbs are best used to treat cold conditions. Think of a person who has achy bones on a cold winter day. You wouldn’t offer that person a plate full of cucumbers to make them feel better but you might offer them a warm cup of ginger tea. Cooling herbs help to detoxify and to remove inflammation. Think of someone who is experiencing symptoms of a heat stroke. This is where you would possible offer a plate full of cold cucumbers or watermelon.
 
   There are numerous other things to consider when you are choosing the right herbs for your health. This is just a much abbreviated explanation that I hope helps to explain why the energy and taste of herbs are mentioned in these blogs. Now on to today’s herbs.
 
Western Herb

Oregon grape Root(Mahonia Aquifolium)
 
Parts Used: Rhizome and Root
 
Energy and Taste: Cool and bitter
 
Constituents: Berberine alkaloid, columbamine, hydrastine, jatrorrhizine, oxyacanthine, tetrahydroberberine, tannins.
 
Internal Uses: Liver, menstrual irregularities, skin diseases, arthritis. The yellow rhizomes are used as a hepatic biliary stimulant enhancing the flow of bile throughout the liver and gallbladder. This helps to improve the liver function. Can be taken as a tincture or tea form. Do not take if you have hyperthyroid issues.
 
Topical Uses:  A cream containing 10 % can be applied to rashes to help irritation.
 
 

Osha Root(Ligusticum Porteri)
 
Parts Used:  Root
 
Constituents:  Alkaloids, camphor, sapononins, ferulic acid, terpenes, phytosterols.
 
Energy and Taste: Bitter and cool
 
Internal Uses:  Aids in digestion, colds, cough, and flu fevers. 3-9 grams or 10-30 drops of tincture.
 

 
Chinese Herb

Oyster Shell (Mu LI)
 
Concha Ostrea Gigas
 
Energy and Taste: Astringent, cold and salty.
 
Constituents: Calcium, copper, iron, polysaccharides, sodium, magnesium.
 
Internal Uses:  Good for anxiety, palpitations, insomnia, irritability and excessive anger. 15-30 grams
 
 
Hope any of this information was helpful. Check back for the next blog on helpful herbs beginning with the letter P.
 
 
 
 
 
Resources
The Way of Ayurvedic Herbs: A Contemporary Introduction and Useful Manual for the World's Oldest Healing System, Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa and Michael Tierra
 
The Way of Chinese Herbs, Michael Tierra
 
The Way of Herbs: Fully Updated with the Latest Developments in Herbal Science, Michael Tierra

Helpful herbs from A to Z- The letter N.

Posted on January 14, 2016 at 8:44 PM Comments comments (0)
 
     Today’s blog is on helpful herbs in Western, Ayurveda and Chinese herbalism that begin with the letter N.  Before we get into these herbs and their properties I would like to begin with the taste of herbs. In every blog post about herbs I include the energy and taste of the herb. I wanted to explain why taste is important to the body in choosing an herbal remedy for your overall health and wellness.
 
     The first taste I want to talk about is Sour. These herbs are usually astringent or drying in nature and help to drain things. They are often acid in nature (think of a lemon) and this helps to cleanse and detoxify the body. One of the ways that a sour herb does that is through taking a fat soluble toxin and making it more of a water soluble toxin that is easier to excrete by the kidneys. This is one of the reasons you will see all those articles about drinking lemon water to help you lose weight.
 
     The next taste is bitter. These herbs are known to drain and dry. They are used for the heart, respiration, digestion, and immune function. They are often anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antibacterial, and alkaloid. These properties help to move things out of the body (liver cleansing, lung and mucus cleansing, and blood purifying). They are best taken in smaller doses as too much will have an adverse effect on the body.
 
     The next taste is sweet and they are to nourish and strengthen the body. Simple sugars are more readily available to utilize by the body. The brain, muscles, and tissues feed on glucose. When this is easily available the digestive system doesn’t have to work as hard and energy is preserved. This is only referring to natural food sugars (think yams or molasses) not refined sugars that harm your body. A major class of compounds called heteropolysaccharides are in many herbs that strengthen the immune system (like astragalus) and have been well studies for these benefits. These are to be taken in small doses for short periods of time.
 
     The next taste is pungent also referred to as acrid. These herbs have a dispersing and moving effect on the body. They are good for the liver, and lungs as they help to prevent stagnation and to move mucus. Think of herbs like black pepper, cayenne pepper, ginger, onion, garlic, horseradish. These herbs help to warm the organs and disperse mucus.
 
     The last taste is salty and these herbs are good for the kidneys, the heart, and to dissolve things. Salty herbs can tone and moisturize tissues but when taken in too high a concentration they will dry and irritate. Salt helps to balance potassium, calcium, and phosphorus in the body. These are herbs like sea side plants (kelp) celery and parsley. Use only in small and therapeutic doses.
 
      This was only a short introduction into the taste of herbs and why they matter but I think it will help in understanding how herbs work and why.
 
Here are some helpful herbs that begin with the letter N.
 
Western Herb
Nettles (Urtica Urens)
 
Parts used: Leaves
 
Energy and Taste: Cool, bland and slightly bitter.
 
Constituents:  High amounts of chlorophyll, indoles, including histamine and serotonin, acetylcholine, vitamin C, A, potassium, protein and fiber.
 
Internal Uses: Diuretic, astringent tonic, hemostatic, expectorant, and nutritive tincture that is helpful in allergies. The high concentration of nutrients in nettles make it great for anemia, asthma, and rheumatic conditions. A study of nettle roots found them to be very effective in the treatment of enlarged prostate. Take as a tincture 10-30 drops, as a pill, or a tea.

Topical uses: Helps to stimulate hair growth in shampoos, serums, or oils. Also stops bleeding when applied topically on wounds.
 
 
Ayurveda Herb
Neem (Azadiracta indica)
 
Ayurvedic Name: Nimba
 
Parts Used: Seeds, leaves, and bark
 
Energy and Taste: Cooling, pungent and bitter astringent.
 
Constituents: isomeldenim, nimbin, nimbinene, quercetin, beta-sit sterol, terpenoids, limonoids, azadrachtin.
 
Internal Uses: Purifies the blood, stimulates insulin secretion in the pancreas, is antimicrobial and is often referred to as “the village pharmacy” because of its numerous benefits. 250 to 500 mg a day, or as a tea.
 
Topical uses: parasites, eczema, acne, eye inflammations, gum inflammations. Use as a powder, in ghee, in tincture, or tea or neem oil.

 
Chinese Herb
Notopterygium (Qiang Huo)
This herb is endangered due to excessive cultivation
 
Parts Used: Root and Rhizome
 
Energy and taste: Warm, aromatic and bitter.
 
Constituents: furanocoumarins, notopterol, falcorindiol and phenethyl ferulate = antioxidants, anti-cancer properties, cyclooxygenase inhibitors.
Internal Uses: 6-12 grams
 
 
     These blogs are not meant to treat, diagnose, or cure anything.
They are intended for educational purposes only. Always check with your physician before taking any herbs or vitamins.

     Hope of any of the above information was helpful and check back for the next blog on the letter O.

Resources
The Way of Ayurvedic Herbs: A Contemporary Introduction and Useful Manual for the World's Oldest Healing System, Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa and Michael Tierra
 
The Way of Chinese Herbs, Michael Tierra
 

The Way of Herbs: Fully Updated with the Latest Developments in Herbal Science, Michael Tierra

Helpful herbs from A to Z - the letter M.

Posted on January 5, 2016 at 3:43 PM Comments comments (0)

   Today’s blog is on helpful herbs that begin with the letter M. This blog is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent anything. It is for educational purposes only. Please always use caution when taking any herb or vitamin and check with your physician for any contraindications.

 
Western Herb

Milk Thistle (Silybum Marianum, Cardos Marianus)

Parts used - Seeds and aerial portions.

Energy and taste - Bitter, sweet and cool.

Constituents - Flavolignans collectively known as silymarin

Internal uses - Hepatoprotective, bitter tonic, demulcent, antidepressant, liver protective and regenerative that helps with chronic liver cirrhosis, necrosis, hepatitis A and B. It is a hypolipidemic that lowers fat deposits in the liver (fatty liver disease)
Dose - 420 milligrams daily in capsule or tea.

Topical uses - Anti-inflammatory that helps with rashes and acne when applied in a cream or lotion.
Do not take while pregnant and if you have any allergies to ragweed or daisies.


Chinese Herb

Motherwort(Yi Mu Cao)
Leonurus Cardiaca

Parts used - Leaves

Energy and taste - Slightly bitter, cold, and acrid.

Constituents - Alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, vitamin A.

Do not use while pregnant as this herb stimulates uterine contractions.

Internal uses - Emmenagogue, anti hypertensive, antispasmodic, diuretic, antibacterial, anti fungal. Helps with edema, promotes blood circulation, and helps with nervous cardiac disorders, thyroid hyper function, and eye issues.
Dose - 2-4 ml in a tincture

Topical uses – Helps with itchy skin and shingles when applied topically in creams or lotions.


Ayurveda Herb

Myrrh(Commiphora Myrrh)

Ayurveda name - Bola

Parts used - resin

Energy and taste – Hot, astringent, and pungent.

Constituents - Volatile oils, sesquiterpenes, myrcene, acamphorene, guggulstrol, glycoresins, polysaccharides, potassium, tannins.

Internal uses – Helps with gingivitis, digestive problems, mouth ulcers, ulcerative colitis.
Dose -1 to 2 ml three times a day in capsules.

Topical uses - An antimicrobial and detoxifying herb that is good for oral health when used in a tooth powder or a mouth wash.

Hope any of the above information was helpful. Check back for the next blog on helpful herbs that begin with the letter N.
Resources

The Way of Ayurvedic Herbs: A Contemporary Introduction and Useful Manual for the World's Oldest Healing System, Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa and Michael Tierra
 
The Way of Chinese Herbs, Michael Tierra
 

The Way of Herbs: Fully Updated with the Latest Developments in Herbal Science, Michael Tierra

Helpful herbs from A to Z - the letter L.

Posted on January 5, 2016 at 3:05 PM Comments comments (0)
 Today's blog is on helpful herbs that begin with the letter L.
 
   But first I wanted to begin with why herbs can benefit the overall health and wellness of a person.  In learning about herbs and their chemical constituents I see several key components come up over and over again. I thought we could break down two of these reoccurring components and see why they help to support ones system.

Flavonoids – they are responsible for a plants deep pigments like in a blueberry or purple cabbage. The darker the plant the more antioxidants and anti-inflammatory benefits that plant has. They support cardiovascular health and nervous system health. Additionally they detoxify your body and help to remove tissue damaging molecules and free radical damage.

Triterpenoids – they have a steroidal effect, are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferation effect, support healthy cellular aging, and have anti-cancer benefits.

     These are just two of the several chemical components that make up herbs and plants that contribute to the overall health and wellness of a body when taken on a regular basis.

     The first herb is one that gets used often for its scent but has numerous health benefits to the body.

 
Western Herb

Lavender(Lavender Angustifolia, L Officinallis)

Parts used - Flowers

Energy and taste - Spicy, mildly bitter, and cool.

Constituents - Oil linalool, lavendulylacetate, borneol, camphor, limonene, cadinene, courmarins, ursilic acids, flavonoids.

Internal uses – It is a nervine, anti-inflammatory, anti-depressant, antiseptic, analgesic, and good for the lungs and liver.
Dose - 10-30 drops of tincture in water, drink as a tea 2 to 3 times a day. You can also add 4-6 drops in hot water and inhale the steam to help your lungs.

Topical uses - Good for burns or eczema, rashes and pain relief. Can look for in products or place a few drops in a bath, or use the undiluted oil on burns.

Chinese Herb

Licorice (Gan Cao) Radix Glycyrrhizin Uralensis

Parts used - roots

Energy and taste - Neutral and sweet


Constituents -Glycyrrhizin acid, flavonoids, immune stimulant sugars.

Internal uses - Helps with upper respiratory issues, adrenal fatigue, boosts prostaglandin production and supports the body’s release of cortisol while inhibiting some of the more detrimental side effects of cortisol. Do not use if you are pregnant, or if you have heart issues, hypertension, kidney, liver or low potassium issues.
Dose – Can be taken in teas, tinctures, or capsules.

Topical uses - Anti-inflammatory that helps to minimize redness and inflammation in the skin in conditions like eczema and acne. Look for in creams, lotions or masks.

Ayurveda Herb

Lotus (Nelumbo Nucifera)

Ayurveda name - Padma, Kamala, Poshkara

Parts used - Root and seed.

Energy and taste - Sweet, astringent, and cooling.

Constituents - Phytonutrients, minerals, vitamins, fiber, high in vitamin C, B complex, cooper, iron, magnesium and manganese.

Internal uses - Rejuvenates, is an astringent, hemostatic, and nervine. Good for the heart and the reproductive system.
Dose - Eat the seeds and peel and eat the root like a potato. It can be taken in tea or capsule form.

Topical uses - Purifies the skin, moisturizes and soothes and is very high in vitamin C and B. Look for it in skin care products as an extract in creams or lotions.
 

Hope any of the above information was helpful. Always check with your physician before taking any herbs or vitamins. Next blog post will be on the letter M.

Resources
The Way of Ayurvedic Herbs: A Contemporary Introduction and Useful Manual for the World's Oldest Healing System, Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa and Michael Tierra
 
The Way of Chinese Herbs, Michael Tierra
 

The Way of Herbs: Fully Updated with the Latest Developments in Herbal Science, Michael Tierra

Helpful herbs from A to Z - the letter K

Posted on January 5, 2016 at 2:04 PM Comments comments (0)


 
    Today’s blog is on the letter K and three herbs in Western, Chinese, and Ayurveda medicine that are useful. But first we have to begin with the traditional disclaimer. This blog is for educational purposes only, and is not intended to treat, diagnose, prevent or cure any disease. Always check with your physician before taking any herbs or herbal supplements.
 
Western Herb

 Kava Kava (Piper Methysticum)

Energy and Taste:Pungent, bitter, and warm.

Parts Used - Root

Constituents – Resin, kavalactones, yagonin, methysticin, glycosides, starch, analgesic, antispasmodic, antiseptic, sedative, diuretic, tonic.
Treats – Relives rheumatic pain, alleviates insomnia and nervousness.
Dose – 10-50 drops of tincture a day

 Internal uses- In Europe Kava is an approved phytomedicine which is used to treat anxiety and depression. The kavalactones in Kava Kava act primarily on the limbic system. Do not take if you have liver toxicity, renal disease, bile duct obstruction or hepatic disease.  Do not take if you have heart issues or if you are on anti-coagulants. Do not take with alcohol, barbiturates, or any other anti-psychotic medications or anti-anxiety medications, or while pregnant or nursing. Short term use is best.

Topical uses - The tincture (1 part kava tincture to 2 parts glycerin) has a numbing effect when applied topically and is anti-fungal.
 

 
Chinese Herb

Kombu (laminarice japonica)
Sea cabbage – Edible seaweed in Japanese. It is a kelp that grows in tropical waters. Large brown algae.

 Constituents – Polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharide, amino acids, volatile oil, carotene, vitamins B1, B2, C, and P, sulfur, potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus iron, manganese, molybdenum, iodine, aluminum, phosphate.

Parts used – All parts of the plant are used.

Energy and taste – Cold and salty.

Internal uses – Reduces edema and helps renal health, helps with atherosclerosis, hypertension, chronic bronchitis, chronic hepatitis, anemia, helps with endocrine function, constipation, helps with skin and hair.

Dose - 5 to 15 grams in pills or tincture daily.Because this is cold in nature it should be avoided by cold deficient people. High in iodine and potassium so avoid if you have kidney issues, hyperthyroidism or are breastfeeding or pregnant.

Topical uses – High mineral content helps add important minerals to skin in masks or creams.
 

Ayurveda Herb

Kutki (Picrorhiza Kurroa)

Ayurveda name - Katuka

Parts Used - Root

Energy and taste - Cold and pungent.

Constituents - Kutkin molecules, glycosides picroside I, II, III, picrorhizin, androsin, apocynin, drosin and cucurbitacin.

Internal uses - These constituents alter the structure of the outer membrane of the hepatocytes in such a way as to prevent penetration of the liver toxins into the interior of the cell. It stimulates the regenerative ability of the liver, and is anti-inflammatory. Good for coughs, asthma, liver issues, bronchitis and eye inflammation. Do not take if you are hypoglycemic as one of the purposes of this herb is to stimulate digestive secretions, normalize the function of the liver and help to store blood sugar in the form of glycogen.
Dose - 250-500 mg daily.

Hope the above information was helpful! Next blog will be on helpful herbs that begin with the letter L.


Resources
The Way of Ayurvedic Herbs: A Contemporary Introduction and Useful Manual for the World's Oldest Healing System, Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa and Michael Tierra
 
The Way of Chinese Herbs, Michael Tierra
 

The Way of Herbs: Fully Updated with the Latest Developments in Herbal Science, Michael Tierra



Helpful herbs from A to Z- The letter J

Posted on December 10, 2015 at 2:38 PM Comments comments (0)

     This blog is a little behind schedule but better late than never! As always use caution when taking any herbs or herbal supplements. None of the below information is intended for treatment or to diagnose, only to inform.

Chinese Herb

Japanese Knotweed (Polygonum Cuspidatum)

Parts Used - Roots and leaves

Energy is cool, tastes are bitter and sour.

Constituents -  resveratrol, vitamin C, transresveratrol, emodin, emodin monomethyl ether, polydatin (piceid) piceatannol, physcion, astringin, oxalic acid, alkaloids, phenolics, sterol/terpenes, barium, bromine, calcium, catechin, chrysophanol, citreosein, copper, dimethylhyroxychromone, fallacinol, glucofragulin, glucoside, iodine, iron, isoquercitrin, manganese, methylcourmarin, molybdenum, napthoquinone, nickel, phosphorus, physide, piceid, plastoquinine, potassium, sulfur, tannin, zinc.

Internal Uses - This herb is good for cardiovascular health, to prevent or reduce fevers, antitoxin (an antibody that counteracts a toxin), and helps to move blood. Most often used to treat injuries, boils, burns, abscess, bites, stings, and hepatitis. Suggested doses are a ½ tsp of a tincture of the root 3 times daily.

Topical Uses - The leaves can be crushed and powdered to form a paste for topical use.
Caution: do not use if pregnant or breast feeding. There is a drug interaction with several medications such as blood thinners, please consult with a physician before using.

Western Herb

Juniper (Juniper Communis)

Parts Used- Berries

Energy is warm and spicy and sweet.

Constituents -Monoterpenes, alpha and beta pinene, sabinene, limonene, terpinen 4-ol, alpha-terpineol, borneol, geraniol, myrcene, camphene, camphor, alpha-eudesmol, neolignan glycosides, lignans, tannins, flavonoids.

Internal uses - This herb is good for urinary problems, gout, rheumatic complaints, is a diuretic, is a carminative, antiseptic, and a stimulant, good for respiratory health, kidney stones, and uric acid buildup. Recommended dose is 10-30 drops in a tincture or 4 to 6 drops of oil taken with honey 3 to 4 times a day.

Topical uses - The oil can be used to treat skin issues like acne, athlete’s foot, eczema, and joint pains, rheumatism, and cellulite. Dilute oil in a carrier oil like grape seed oil or jojoba oil.

Ayurveda Herb

Jambul (Syzygium Cuminij Eugenia Jambolonum)

Parts used - Fruits and seeds

Energy is neutral, taste is astringent and is a carminative.

Constituents - anthocyanins, alkaloids, flavonoids, glycoside called antimellin, vitamin A, C, and calcium, gallic acid, and tannins.

Internal Uses - This herb is an anti-diabetic, anti-diarrhea, colic, and antimicrobial. Recommended dose is 0.3 to 2 grams of dried fruit 3 times a day.

Topical Uses - A paste from the leaves can be applied to wounds.

Use with caution if you are taking anti-diabetic medication because of this fruits’ blood sugar lowering properties.
 

Hope any of the above information was helpful. Check back next week for helpful herbs that begin with the letter K!

Resources
The Way of Ayurvedic Herbs: A Contemporary Introduction and Useful Manual for the World's Oldest Healing System, Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa and Michael Tierra
 
The Way of Chinese Herbs, Michael Tierra
 

The Way of Herbs: Fully Updated with the Latest Developments in Herbal Science, Michael Tierra


Rss_feed

0